Liscarroll:Scenario Development Wargame (Continued)

The header picture is another lovely shot of Liscarroll Castle recently taken by a John Bedell.

An eye-witness account of the battle indicates that the Irish foot were drawn up in three “masses” which has led many to assume that Barry had placed his troops in Spanish tercio formations (or at least some semblance of such). Here is an interesting blog post which gives a concise description of the battle as well as a conjecture on tercio-like formations.

Liscarroll II:

The Irish Army now uses a tercio unit structure:

Liscarroll_sbB1

Irish:  One militia pike LTE (C), one militia foot LTE (C), one foot LTE (B), two retinue horse GA (B), one light gun and one heavy gun. Army VDT (demoralization value) is 14. Army CS (command structure) is poor. CO is Garret Barry (1) with three subordinates (each 1)

The Anglo/Irish have the same unit structure as Liscarroll I:

“English”: two P&M (B), two musketeer T (B), two retinue horse GA (B) and two light guns. Army VDT is 14. Army CS is average. CO is Lord Inchiquin (3) with one subordinate (2).

The English horse pinched in more toward the center but again the Irish horse charged, forcing the English to counter charge. The melee’ fighting is fairly even and Lord Inchiquin manages to stay alive (so far). The Irish guns are a bit more effective this time, causing some disorganization in the English infantry and, although taking hits, the Irish Militia drives the Musketeers on the English left off the field (large white die in center indicating that the musketeers took four casualties):

Liscarroll_sbB2

The rest of the English foot come up and give crashing first volleys against the Irish, killing the commander of the advancing Irish pike block. Further to the right the English score a total of seven hits on the Irish regular foot but these translate into very few permanent casualties:

Liscarroll_sbB3

At this point (turn 4) it is essential for the English that their cavalry wing does not collapse.

As things proceed, the Irish heavy gun manages to destroy one of the two English P&M regiments and the remaining infantry, blazing away now at close range, fail to impede the advancing Irish foot:

Liscarroll_sbB4

In the new round of melee’s the Irish horse easily outfight the English and it is game over (Although Lord Inchiquin managed to survive):

Liscarroll_sbB5

This replay wasn’t even close. It was all over in five turns with the Irish not giving up a single VDT point. The tercio formations are tough and can take a good deal of punishment (although the English inability to translate hits to actual casualties was abysmal).

The Irish and English horse in both games were perfectly matched with the English having a slight advantage in command. The English simply couldn’t win melee’s. In both games they only managed to win one out of five with three draws. I am looking into picking a new set of dice for the English. The Irish lost the historic battle largely do to Inchiquin’s horse holding together and attacking the Irish in the flank which ultimately caused the Irish foot, who had been fighting quite bravely, to break and run. Without the same result from the English horse in these games, it is difficult for the English to win.

I continue to be pleased with the Baroque rules set. They are fun, quick, and give, I think, reasonable results. They are perhaps not the best pick for many of my battles on the Celtic Fringe because they are not particularly designed for the highly variable unit sizes or the really ragged quality of troops. I have considered adding a “D” discipline level but this would turn such units into pretty much terrain features. My house rules (which allow for some specialized groupings of units) may work better to this end but I don’t have sufficient data yet to know.

My next step here will be to set up the scaled-up version of Liscarroll and work through the battle more precisely. In the meantime however I’m going over to Signa et Portenta and start working on the War of the Orbs.

 

One thought on “Liscarroll:Scenario Development Wargame (Continued)

  1. It’s too bad that Jay’s family lives in North Carolina. Aaron and Bear might have been interested in playing war games with you. Don’t give up on Jack. Ask again.

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